Topics for the MARC XI conference will continue along the themes from previous conferences. Specific information regarding the sessions is provided below and may change as abstracts are submitted and evaluated. Some sessions have additional information (descriptions) and will be available if you click on the title. Please contact the session organizer or the Program Chair, Sam Glover, with any questions.

1. General Call for Papers
Organized by S. Glover, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, USA and S. LaMont, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

Description
This category is used for submission of papers which may not fit well into the existing sessions or the author is unsure which session is the best fit. All papers submitted in the General Call will be assigned an appropriate session.

2. Quality Assurance Topics in Radioanalytical Chemistry: Attribution to Root Cause
Organized by K. Inn, NIST, USA; and S. Jerome, National Physics Laboratory, UK

Description
QA/QC forensic analysis leading to root cause remediation is the focus of this session that will embrace investigative studies with high-level radiochemical expertise, and document the lessons learned.

Analytical radiochemistry quality assurance [QA] and quality control [QC] are not spectator sports. Neither one is an end to themselves. Dependable, reliable, accurate, precise, ground-truth, take-to-the-bank, are all attributes we want to stand with our scientific conclusions, decisions, recommendations, and theories in both practice and research. Quality control and quality assurance practices are key to building strength into these attributes. Such activities lend invaluable support to acquiring and maintaining accreditation to standards such as ISO 17025:2005.

This session will explore and examine new and improved tools for monitoring analytical radiochemical measurements, e.g., measurement quality objectives, reference materials, performance testing, audits, acceptance criteria, graphics, statistics, experimental design. However, to make QC/QA meaningful, vigilance and critical thinking must be constantly exercised. Early signatures of process deviations and bias need to be forensically analyzed and attributed, and the root cause remediated.

3. Current Needs and Future Challenges for Nuclear & Radiological Reference Materials & Proficiency Testing Materials
Organized by J. Mann, National Institute for Standards and Technology; S. Healey, Food and Drug Administration, USA; S. Lee, Korea Standards Research Institute, Korea; and A. Tamasi, Environmental Protection Agency, USA

Description
A robust supply of Reference Materials (RMs) and Proficiency testing (PT) materials is needed to ensure the quality of analyses performed for a range of nuclear and radiological applications including bioassay, environmental, emergency response, food safety, forensics, medical, nuclear power plant decontamination-decommissioning, nuclear safeguards, nuclear terrorism, public safety, and treaty monitoring. RMs and PT materials provide the foundation for accurate and precise measurements which provide the credible data necessary for developing, testing, and validating nuclear and radioanalytical methods. Without RMs for accurate measurements, policy makers would have difficulty making informed and responsible decisions based on analytical data that would stand up to scientific, public, and judicial scrutiny. The objective of this session will be to develop actionable RMs and PTs for the identified areas of need and to generate a list of point persons to champion these RMs and PT materials.

4. Environmental Radioactivity
Organized by H. Spitz, University of Cincinnati, USA; S. Metairon, Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil; D.P. Hickman, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA; E. Widom, Miami University, USA

Description
Environmental radioactivity has typically been the largest session at MARC, comprising a full day of oral presentations and one or more poster sessions. Papers are typically grouped into sub-sessions as themes are developed.

5. Radioecology studies in support of Fukushima
Organized by G. Steinhauser, University of Hannover, Germany; T. Nakanishi, University of Tokyo, Japan

Description
The Fukushima nuclear accident has caused significant releases of radionuclides into the environment. This session welcomes radioecological contributions to this topic. This includes classical radioecology in any environmental media, food safety, human and environmental health aspects, environmental nuclear forensics, and others. The comparison with other accidents is welcome. We also welcome presentations on methodological advances in radionuclide analysis, especially on the understudied radionuclides that may be related to nuclear accidents.

6. Ultra-sensitive Mass Spectrometric and Radiometric Methods for Environmental and Space Applications
Organized by P. Povinec, University of Bratislava, Slovakia

Description
Recent developments in mass spectrometric methods (e.g. AMS, ICPMS, TIMS, LIMS, RIMS, SIMS, …), as well as in radiometric methods (e.g. underground gamma- and beta-ray spectrometry, shielding of detectors from cosmic radiation, coincidence-anticoincidence systems,…) have improved considerably the sensitivity of analysis of cosmogenic, primordial/radiogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides, which decreased a sample size required for environmental studies. These developments have allowed to carry out investigations, which were not possible before either because of the lack of sensitivity, or availability of suitable samples. A wide range of applications of ultra-sensitive techniques with applications in environmental and space applications will be covered as well.

7. Separation Chemistry and Target Preparation for Nuclear Chemistry Experiments
Organized by E. Bond, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA and Ralf Sudowe, Colorado State University, USA

Description
To be added

8. Nuclear Decay Data for Chronometry and Nuclear Forensics Measurements
Organized by T. Parsons-Moss, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA; S. Jerome, National Physics Laboratory, UK; H. Cheng, China

Description
To be added

9. Isotope Production for Nuclear Security, Nonproliferation, and Geochemistry Applications
Organized by D. Condon, British Geological Survey; Derek Haas, University of Texas, USA; W. Runde, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

Description
To be added

10. Application of Nuclear Techniques to National Security and Treaty Monitoring
Organized by H. Miley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA and S. Biegalski, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Description
To be added

11. International Status and Challenges of Radiochemistry Education and Training
Organized by C. Walther, University of Hannover, Germany; A. Zeitoun, Department of Homeland Security, USA.

Description
The session covers nuclear and radiochemistry education and vocational training as it relates to requirements from regulators, industry, and national security mission sets. The session will plan to discuss supply and demand for students in different countries as well as innovative methods, including but not limited to remote teaching methods such as web-based courses, implemented to address the declining expertise. Presentations on international cooperative projects and national programs from spokespersons or representatives of this topic area are highly welcome. The session shall comprise short topical presentations followed by a panel discussion.

12. Instrumental, Preconcentration, Radiochemicial and Speciation Activation Analysis
Organized by A. Chatt, Dalhousie University CANADA

Description
To be added

13. Advances in Actinide Analytical and Radionuclear Chemistry
Organized by L. Tandon, Los Alamos, National Laboratory, USA; P. Kaye, Atomic Weapons Establishment, UK; and P. Thompson, Atomic Weapons Establishment, UK

Description
To be added

14. Actinide Mass Spectrometry Techniques and Applications
Organized by R. Steiner, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; J. Giglio, Idaho National Laboratory, USA; G. Eiden, Pacific Northwest National Laboratoryy, USA; A. Gaffney, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA; and F. Pointurier, CEA, FRANCE.

Description
To be added

15. Nuclear Forensics for Radioactive Sources and Radiological Dispersal Devices
Organized by McLain, D, Argonne National Laboratory, USA; Snow, M. Idaho National Laboratory, USA

Description
To be added

16. Radioanalytical Tools and Techniques for Emergency Response in the Laboratory and in the Field
Organized by A. Plionis, Remote Sensing Laboratory, USA; P. Saey, IAEA, Vienna

Description
To be added

17. Advances in Radiation Imaging and Their Applications
Organized by M. Abir, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; and T. Nakanishi, University of Tokyo, Japan

Description
This section comprises different imaging (e.g. X-ray, neutron, gamma, radioisotope, etc.) modalities and their advancements to scientific research. This includes but not limited to hardware and software developments for X-ray, neutron, gamma or radioisopte imaging including CT, PET, MRI, etc. Hardware development may include detectors, sources, optics, sample preparation, collimators, etc. Software development may include the development of data processing approach such as, limited-angle CT, etc. The session will also discuss about the application of imaging and the utilization of different modalities for non-destructive testing.

18. Development and Application of Nuclear Analytical Methods with Neutron Beam Technologies.
Organized by L. Cao, Ohio State University, USA; and G. Downing, NIST, USA.

Description
One breach of nuclear analytical methods is involved of using a collimated neutron beam for non-destructive materials analysis and characterization. The neutron beam could be using fast neutron as produced by a neutron generator for in-field applications, or a stationary neutron source such as a research nuclear reactor that could deliver either thermal or cold neutron beam for a high sensitive materials probing. A recent successful application of neutron beam technology is for characterizing lithium atoms inside a Li-ion battery to assist the energy storage studies. The development and application of neutron-based techniques is welcome to this session, which includes but not limited to neutron depth profiling, prompt gamma neutron activation analysis, neutron imaging, etc. Development of neutron generator, advanced sensor and instrumentation are also invited to this session.

19. Biogeochemical Processes Controlling Radionuclide Mobility: Field, Laboratory and modeling studies
Organized by A. Kersting, LLNL, USA

Description
To be provided.

20. Advances in Gamma Spectrometry for Nonproliferation and Nuclear Security
Organized by G. Lasche, (Snake Dance Scientific, USA), J. Burnett (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA) and C. Aalseth (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA).

Description
To be provided

21. Advances in Gamma Spectrometry Methods, Instrumentation, and Software in Support of Field Portable Instrumentation
Organized by G. Lasche, (Snake Dance Scientific, USA), J. Burnett (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA) and C. Aalseth (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA).

Description
To be provided

22. From Fuel to Fuel: Actinide, Lanthanide, and Fission Product Separations
Organized by C. Ekberg, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; and M. Nilsson, University of California, Irvine, USA.

Description
to be provided


23. Nuclear Methods for Food Security and Preservation
Organized by E. Fernandes, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil; and M. Lacroix, Canadian Irradiation Center, Canada

Description
to be provided


24. Applications of Radioanalytical Chemistry and Neutron Activation Analysis for Nuclear Medicine and Biological Systems
Organized by W. Runde, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

Description
to be provided


25. Unraveling the Mystery of Nuclear Materials: Synchrotron Radiation Techniques
Organized by W. Shi, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; and D. Shuh, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA.

Description
One branch of nuclear analytical methods involves using synchrotron radiation techniques for non-destructive material analysis and characterization. Synchrotron radiation (SR) based techniques have been utilized with increasing frequency in the past decade to explore the brilliant and challenging sciences of nuclear materials. This trend is partially driven by the basic needs for multi-scale actinide speciation and bonding information and also the realistic needs for nuclear energy research. In this session, recent research progresses on nuclear materials by means of various SR techniques (with emphasis on X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scattering spectroscopy) will be presented and discussed..

26. Radioanalytical Methods in Nuclear Materials Processing
Organized by Organized by N. Xu, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; and R. Runkle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA

Description
This session will explore recent advances in radioanalytical methods applied to the processing of nuclear materials, including signatures from reprocessing spent fuel, the fate of legacy nuclear waste, and forensics signatures derived from nuclear materials processing activities. We seek papers on emerging topics in radioanalytical chemistry used to enable the processing of irradiated materials from interfacial chemistry through bulk materials.

27. Advances in Nuclear and Radiochemistry Supporting Nuclear Forensics
Organized by A. Jackman, Department of Energy, USA; T. Bredeweg, Los Alamos National Laboratory; J. Friese, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA; and W. Oldham, Los Alamos

Description
Advances in nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry and related fields that are relevant to enhancing national and international nuclear forensics capabilities.

28. Advances in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Improvements in High Activity Separations Methods
Organized by D. DiPrete, SRNL, USA; F. Goutelard, CEA, France; R. Brennetot, CEA, France

Description
to be provided


29. Radioanalytical Methods for Safeguards, Nonproliferation, and Nuclear Forensic
Organized by H. Dion, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; A. King, Atomic Weapons Establishment, UK

Description
to be provided