MARC Conference

Technical Sessions

MARC XII is being organized into six (6) tracks that include a General Call for Papers so if you do not see your specific topic covered in the current sessions please choose the general call when you submit your abstract. Each of the tracks will also be included as an option if you are uncertain about which particular

The session may be the best fit for your presentation in a Track. The organizers will find the right home for your presentation or contact you in the very unusual event it is not well suited for the scope of the conference.

The current list of sessions and their organizers within each track are shown and will be updated from time to time. The final list of sessions and technical program of MARC will be developed after the abstract submission closes in December. Please see the presentation and publication tab on the website for more information regarding timelines.

Track 1: General Call for Papers
Track 2: Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation
Track 3: Environmental Radioactivity
Track 4: Activation Analysis, Neutron Beam and Imaging
Track 5: Analytical Methods of Fission Products and Fuels
Track 6: Nuclear Science and Education

Track 1. General Call for Papers

Organized by Sam Glover, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, USA, and Steve LaMont, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

This category is used for the submission of papers that may not fit well into the existing sessions or the author is unsure which Session is the best fit. All papers submitted in the General Call will be assigned an appropriate session. If you don’t see a match to the content of your presentation then choose the General Track within that group or choose 1. General Call for Papers and the Program Chair will make sure to get your paper the most appropriate session.

Track 2. Nuclear Security and Forensics Track

Organized by Amy Gaffney; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA; Steve LaMont, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Harry Miley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; and Steve Biegalski, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA.

Nuclear Security and Nuclear Forensics sessions have grown strongly over the years to become a backbone of the MARC Conference, comprising several days of oral presentations and one or more poster sessions. Papers are typically grouped into sub-sessions as themes are developed. At this time these themes include the following topical areas that will be further developed as papers and posters come in. Note: If you don’t see a match to the content of your presentation then choose the General Track within that track or choose “1. General Call for Papers” and the Program Chair will make sure to get your paper the most appropriate session.

Session 2A. Radiochronometry Techniques for Nuclear Forensics

Organized by Theresa Kayzar-Boggs, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Kyle Samperton, Savannah River, USA; Matthew Higginson, AWE, UK

Session 2B: Advances in Microscopy, Imaging, and Spatially Resolved Methods for Nuclear Forensics

Organized by James Bowen, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA; Cynthia Zeissler, National Institute for Standards and Technology, USA; and Chloe Bonamici, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA.

Description to be added

Session 2C: Application of Nuclear Techniques to Treaty Monitoring

Organized by Harry Miley, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA; Steve Biegalski, Georgia Tech, USA; Adam Hutter, US Customs and Border Patrol, USA; and Anders Ringbom, FOI, Sweden

Description to be added

Session 2D: Actinide Mass Spectrometry for Treaty Monitoring and Nuclear Forensics

Organized by Fabien Pointurier, CEA, France; Robert Steiner, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Tara Kell, CNSC, Canada; David Child, ANSTO, AU.

Description to be added

Session 2E: Advances in Gamma Spectrometry Methods, Instrumentation, and Software in the Laboratory and in the Field

Organized by George Lasche, Snake Dance Scientific, USA; Craig Aalseth, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA; Jonathan Burnett; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA

Description to be added

Session 2F: Nuclear Data for Nuclear Security

Organized by Tashi Parsons-Davis, Livermore National Laboratory, USA; and Todd Bredeweg, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

Description to be added

Track 3. Environmental Radioactivity

Track Organized by Pavel Povinec, University of Bratislava, Slovakia; Henry Spitz, University of Cincinnati, USA; Elizabeth Widom, Miami University, USA; George Steinhauser, University of Hannover, Germany; Terry Hamilton, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA; Ken Buesseler, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA; Steve Pike, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, USA; and Annie Kersting, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA.

Environmental radioactivity has typically been one of the largest sessions at MARC, comprising several days of oral presentations and one or more poster sessions. Papers are typically grouped into sub-sessions as themes are developed. At this time these themes include the following topical areas that will be further developed as papers and posters come in. Note: If you don’t see a match to the content of your presentation then choose the General Track within that track or choose “1. General Call for Papers” and the Program Chair will make sure to get your paper the most appropriate session.

Session 3A. Ultra-sensitive Mass Spectrometric and Radiometric Methods for Environmental and Space Applications

Organized by Pavel Povinec, University of Bratislava, Slovakia

Recent developments in mass spectrometric methods (e.g. AMS, ICPMS, TIMS, LIMS, RIMS, SIMS, …), as well as in radiometric methods (e.g. underground gamma- and beta-ray spectrometry, shielding of detectors from cosmic radiation, coincidence-anticoincidence systems,…) have improved considerably the sensitivity of analysis of cosmogenic, primordial/radiogenic and anthropogenic radionuclides, which decreased a sample size required for environmental studies. These developments have allowed to carry out investigations, which were not possible before either because of the lack of sensitivity, or availability of suitable samples. A wide range of applications of ultra-sensitive techniques with applications in environmental and space applications will be covered as well.

Session 3B. Biogeochemical Processes Controlling Radionuclide Mobility: Field, Laboratory and Modeling Studies

Organized by Annie Kersting, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

Significant advances have occurred in our understanding of radionuclides in the environment that continue to advance our conceptual models. There is a pressing need to use these advances to predict their mobility in a range of biogeochemical environments. This session focuses on understanding the key biogeochemical processes that mediate radionuclide mobility, including experimental, field, and modeling studies.

Session 3C. Forensic Methods, Analysis and Applications of Wide Area Monitoring for Environmental Releases

Organized by Georg Steinhauser, University of Hannover, Germany; Elise Conte, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA; Kelly McHugh, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA

Applications of forensics from wide-area/environmental monitoring by the nuclear community focusing on methods, analysis, and applications.

Session 3D. Methods and Applications for Radioecology on Land and Sea: Lessons learned from environmental cleanup, weapons testing and radiological accidents

Organized by Henrietta Dulai, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, USA; and Terry Hamilton, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA

Weapons testing programs, Chernobyl, and Fukushima nuclear accident caused significant releases of radionuclides into the environment including the ocean. This Session welcomes radioecological contributions to this topic. This includes classical radioecology in any environmental media, food safety, human and environmental health aspects, environmental nuclear forensics, and others. The comparison with other accidents is welcome. We also welcome presentations on methodological advances in radionuclide analysis, especially on the understudied radionuclides that may be related to nuclear accidents.

Track 4. Activation Analysis, Neutron Beams and Imaging

Track organized by A. Chatt, Dalhousie University CANADA; Lei Cao, Ohio State University, USA; Kenan Unlu, Penn State University, USA; and R. Gregory Downing, National Institute for Standards and Technology (retired), USA.

If you don’t see a match to the content of your presentation then choose the General Track within that group or choose 1. General Call for Papers and the Program Chair will make sure to get your paper the most appropriate session.

Session 4A. Instrumental, Preconcentration, Radiochemical and Speciation Activation Analysis

Organized by A. Chatt, Dalhousie University CANADA

Description to be added

Session 4B. Development and Application of Nuclear Analytical Methods with Neutron Beam Technologies

Organized by Kenan Unlu, Pennsylvania State University, USA; Lei Cao, Ohio State University, USA; and Robert G. Downing, National Institute for Standards and Technology (retired), USA.

One branch of nuclear analytical methods involves the use of collimated neutron beams for non-destructive analysis and characterization of materials. Neutron beam energies can range from fast neutrons as produced by neutron generators for in-field applications, or produced by stationary neutron sources such as a research nuclear reactor delivering either thermal or cold neutron beam for a highly sensitive material probe. A recent successful application of neutron beam technology is the characterization of lithium content and movement inside a Li-ion battery to assist in energy storage studies. The development and application of neutron-based instrumentation and methods are welcome in this session, which includes, but is not limited to, neutron depth profiling, prompt gamma neutron activation analysis, neutron imaging, etc. Use of neutron generators, advanced sensors, and other instrumentation are also invited to this session.

Session 4C. Advances in Radiation Imaging and Their Applications

Organized by Muhammad Abir, Phoenix Nuclear Laboratories, USA.

This section comprises different imaging (e.g. X-ray, neutron, gamma, radioisotope, etc.) modalities and their advancements to scientific research. This includes but is not limited to hardware and software developments for X-ray, neutron, gamma, or radioisotope imaging including CT, PET, MRI, etc. Hardware development may include detectors, sources, optics, sample preparation, collimators, etc. Software development may include the development of a data processing approach such as limited-angle CT, etc. The Session will also discuss the application of imaging and the utilization of different modalities for non-destructive testing.

Session 4D. Proposed session: Neutron Imaging Technologies and Applications

Organized by Aaron Craft, Idaho National Laboratory, USA; Hassina Bilheux, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA; Pavel Trtik, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland; Burkhard Schillinger, Technical University, Munich, Germany; and Takenao Sinohara, J-PARC, Japan.

Neutron imaging enables users to understand the internal structure and behavior of objects using the unique interaction properties of neutrons. This Session includes neutron imaging technologies and their applications for fundamental research, material characterization, and non-destructive examination (NDE). This Session covers new neutron imaging facilities, modifications to existing facilities, detector technologies, imaging techniques, sample environments, development of standards, as well as applications of neutron imaging for energy storage technologies, nuclear materials, NDE of industrial materials, applied physics & chemistry, and fundamental research. Neutron imaging is a broad field, and contributions are welcome from its many facets.

Track 5. Analytical Methods of Fission Products and Fuels

Track Organized by Derek Haas, University of Texas, USA; Anne Co, The Ohio State University, USA; David Diprite, Savannah River National Laboratory, USA; and Rene Brennetot, CEA, France.

Continued development of the nuclear fuel cycle requires advancement in chemical separations and analysis to support advanced reactors and reprocessing. Track 5 will focus on radiochemical techniques and applications related to the fuel cycle and is organized into the sessions below. If you don’t see a match to your presentation’s content then choose the General Track within that group or choose 1. General Call for Papers and the Program Chair will make sure to get your paper the most appropriate session.

Session 5A. Advances in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Improvements in High Activity Separations Methods including Actinide, Lanthanide, and Fission Products

Organized by David DiPrete, SRNL, USA, and Rene Brennetot, CEA, France.

Description to be added

Session 5B. Salt Chemistry and Radiochemistry in Support of Molten Salt Reactors

Organized by David Holcomb, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, USA; Derek Haas, University of Texas, USA.

Research into fission product mobility and removal, online fuel chemistry monitoring and conditioning, and corrosion and impact of salt/surface interactions are among the many radiochemical topics relevant to molten salt reactors. This session will focus on experimental and computational efforts in radiochemistry applied to molten salt reactors.

Session 5C. Analytical and Electrochemical Technology Development for Pyroprocessing

Organized by Michael Simpson, the University of Utah and A. Co, Ohio State University, USA.

Papers are sought on innovative and improved methods for monitoring the pyrochemical processing of nuclear materials. Of particular interest is sensors and methodology for real-time monitoring and process control. Such sensors/methods can be applied to molten salt systems such as oxide reduction, electrorefining, and electrowinning. They can also be applied to other high-temperature operations such as voloxidation, cathode processing (salt distillation), and metal fuel casting. Processing metallic and ceramic waste forms are also of interest. Of particular interest in the application of sensors (electrochemical, radiological, physical, etc.) for safeguarding nuclear material pyroprocessing systems from proliferation. Developments in sample analysis methods are of some interest but should be focused on how to improve the current state of the art for material control and accountability.

Track 6. Nuclear Science and Education

Track organized by Kenneth Inn, National Institute for Standards and Technology (retired); Evelyn. Bond, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Clemens Walther, University of Hannover, Germany; Richard Essex, National Institute for Standards and Technology, USA; Lav Tandon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; and Wolfgang Runde, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA.

If you don’t see a match to the content of your presentation then choose the General Track within that group or choose 1. General Call for Papers and the Program Chair will make sure to get your paper the most appropriate session.

Session 6A. Advances in Actinide Analytical and Radionuclear Chemistry

Organized by Lav Tandon, Los Alamos, National Laboratory, USA; Philip. Kaye, AWE, UK and P. Thompson, AWE, UK.

The production, reprocessing and disposal of nuclear or actinide materials requires detailed knowledge of their chemical, isotopic and structural composition. This session will in general address advances in actinide analytical and radionuclear chemistry Papers are sought on novel tools, techniques and developments of existing analytical (including use of non destructive analysis), radiochemical and morphological methods that offer higher fidelity, greater efficiency, increased safety and reduced nuclear material consumption, either in a laboratory or in-line, on-plant setting. Greater understanding of fundamental separations chemistry as applied to above mentioned applications are also encouraged.

Session 6B. Current Needs and Future Challenges for Nuclear and Radiological Reference Materials and Calibration Phantoms

Organized by R. Essex, National Institute for Standards and Technology, USA; Stefaan Pommé, European Commission, Joint Research Centre (JRC), Belgium

Reference materials are a critical component for quantitative measurements of nuclear materials and radioactivity. Whether they are used for instruments calibration, yield tracing, quality control, or method development, the precision, accuracy, and metrological traceability of measurements are frequently dependent on the characteristics of available standards. This session is intended to provide a venue for topic areas related to nuclear and radiological reference materials including: developing needs for new reference materials; new or proposed reference materials projects; new paradigms or processes for the preparation and/or characterization of reference materials; and new paradigms for measurement calibration and establishing metrological traceability.

Session 6C. Separation Chemistry and Target Preparation for Nuclear Chemistry Experiments

Organized by E. Bond, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA and Ralf Sudowe, Colorado State University, USA.

Description to be added

Session 6D. Isotope Production and Applications: Medical, Space, Nuclear Security, Nonproliferation, and Geochemistry Applications

Organized by Wolfgang Runde, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA; Derek Haas, University of Texas, USA.

Description to be added

Session 6E. International Status and Challenges of Radiochemistry Education and Training

Organized by Clemens Walther, University of Hannover, Germany.

The Session covers nuclear and radiochemistry education and vocational training as it relates to requirements from regulators, industry, and national security mission sets. The Session will plan to discuss supply and demand for students in different countries as well as innovative methods, including but not limited to remote teaching methods such as web-based courses, implemented to address the declining expertise. Presentations on international cooperative projects and national programs from spokespersons or representatives of this topic area are highly welcome. The Session shall comprise short topical presentations followed by a panel discussion.

Session 6F. Future Challenges for Analytical and Radioanalytical Chemistry

Organized by Kenneth Inn, National Institute for Standards and Technology (Retired).

Session to look at future applications and opportunities for radioanalytical chemistry. For example nuclear power plant decontamination and decommissioning, drinking water production, medical uses, long-term battery power for robots and AI units, power for remote resource mining. This effort would require the presenters and audience to look down the road several decades, if not longer, to anticipate emerging and future needs. This would also mean thought could eventually go into grooming future generations of radiochemists to take on these challenges.

Session 6G: Emerging Technologies in Nuclear Nonproliferation

Organized by Anna Erickson (Georgia Tech); Steve Biegalski, Georgia Tech, USA; Malcolm Joyce, Univ. of Lancaster, UK.

Description to be added